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Food Technology

prospec_2014_2405

Year 7

Overview:  Students have a single lesson every two weeks in Food Technology. The format is 1 theory lesson followed by two linked practical lessons.  Students will have an introduction to the food room and its facilities.  They will be taught how to work safely and hygienically.  They will investigate the importance of weighing and measuring and how to use the different parts of the cooker correctly.  They will apply the principles of healthy eating, based on the Eatwell Guide.

Subject content

  • Health and safety rules
  • Different equipment
  • Weighing and measuring
  • Meat and poultry and traditional British recipes
  • Healthy eating and the Eatwell Guide
  • Cooking methods

All recipes will link to the theory work to demonstrate the key issues of the lesson before.  There will be a ratio of 1 sweet dish to 2 savoury dishes across the year.

Literacy:  There are opportunities for written tasks, reading of instructions and putting into practise, listening skills in demonstrations as well as group work.

SMSC:  This is a strength of the subject as the pupils often carry out group work and have to be aware of the needs of others.  Recipes are adapted to consider the implications of cost, season and cultural backgrounds.  Britishness is discussed with reference to traditional dishes.

SEN:  Is adapted to suit individual needs.

Stretch and challenge: Extension tasks are available across the scheme and pupils can adapt recipes to show higher level skills.

Assessment:  Pupils have a range of different assessments to include teacher feedback, self assessment and peer assessment.  Quality Marked Assessment (QMA) sheets provide detailed individual feedback to all pupils.

Homework: This varies and includes written tasks, research work, self assessment and preparing ingredients for the practical lessons.

 

Year 8

Overview:  Students again have a single lesson every two weeks in Food Technology. The format is 1 theory lesson followed by two linked practical lessons.  Students will develop their practical skills further and work on timekeeping and organisational skills.  They will look at the nutrients in further detail and look at food commodities in greater detail.  The functional properties of ingredients will also be considered.

 

Subject content

  • The 5 nutrients – good providers and role in the body
  • Fish – classification, nutritional value and sustainability
  • Cake making methods
  • Chicken – jointing, cost, social and moral implications
  • Fruits – different groups, preservation and preparation techniques.

 

All recipes will link to the theory work to demonstrate the key issues of the lesson before.  There will be a ratio of 1 sweet dish to 2 savoury dishes across the year. The focus will be on baked products and staple foods in the main.

Literacy:  There are opportunities for written tasks, reading of instructions and putting into practise, listening skills in demonstrations as well as group work.

SMSC:  This is a strength of the subject as the pupils often carry out group work and have to be aware of the needs of others.  Recipes are adapted to consider the implications of cost, season and cultural backgrounds.

SEN:  Is adapted to suit individual needs.

Stretch and challenge: Extension tasks are available across the scheme and pupils are encouraged to adapt recipes to show higher level skills.  Individual flair and higher level presentation skills are expected from higher level learners.

Assessment:  Pupils have a range of different assessments to include teacher feedback, self assessment and peer assessment.  Quality Marked Assessment (QMA) sheets provide detailed individual feedback to all pupils.  These include areas of strength and targets for improvement.

Homework: Again this varies and includes written tasks, research work, self assessment and preparing ingredients for the practical lessons.

Year 9

Overview:  Students will develop their practical skills considerably this year as they now have doubles for their practical lessons.  They can really build on the skills from previous years and food will be prepared completely from scratch in school – no pre-preparation is required as the time allows more flexibility.  Students are encouraged to adapt recipes and make them their own.  Theory work is more technical and looks at the working characteristics of ingredients in a range of products.

 

Subject content

  • Multicultural influence on eating habits
  • Food safety – cross contamination and key temperatures
  • Pastry production – rules and function of ingredients
  • Pasta production – function of ingredients and shape development
  • Yeast investigation, linked to functional properties of ingredients in bread
  • Individual Gateau designs
  • Meringue technical challenge
  • Planning techniques

 

All recipes will link to the theory work to demonstrate the key issues of the lesson before.

 

Literacy:  There are opportunities for written tasks, reading of instructions and putting into practise, listening skills in demonstrations as well as group work.

SMSC:  This will continue to be a strength of the subject as the pupils will be carrying out group work and have to be aware of the needs of others. Recipes are adapted to consider individual needs and preferences as well as skill ability.  International cuisine is also a focus this year.

SEN:  Is adapted to suit individual needs.

Stretch and challenge: Extension tasks are available across the scheme and pupils now need to adapt recipes to show higher level skills and demonstrate individual flair.  Independent working is a further requirement in readiness for the GCSE.

Assessment:  Pupils have a range of different assessments to include teacher feedback, self assessment and peer assessment.  Quality Marked Assessment (QMA) sheets provide detailed individual feedback to all pupils.

Homework: This varies and includes written tasks, research work, self assessment and preparing ingredients for the practical lessons.

 

Year 10

Overview:  AQA GCSE Food Preparation and Nutrition is a new, exciting and creative course which focuses on practical cooking skills to ensure you develop a thorough understanding of nutrition, food provenance and the working characteristics of food materials. At its heart, this qualification focuses on nurturing your practical cookery skills to give you a strong understanding of nutrition.

Students have a double lesson and 3 single lessons every 2 weeks.  The double is always a practical and one of the singles will be used for simpler practical skills or investigation work.

Subject content

  1. Food, nutrition and health– macronutrients, micronutrients, nutritional needs and health.
  2. Food science– Cooking of food, as well as the functional and chemical properties of food.
  3. Food safety– Food spoilage, contamination and the principles of food safety.
  4. Food choice– Factors affecting food choice, British and international cuisines, sensory evaluation, food labelling and marketing.
  5. Food provenance– Environmental impact and sustainability of food, food processing and production.

All theory work has practical tasks attached.  Skill based demonstrations are included and tasting of products is another key element.

Literacy:  There are a wide variety of written tasks and independent research and planning is very important.  In addition, the reading of instructions, listening skills in demonstrations and use of descriptors in feedback are regularly incorporated into lessons. Students have plenty of opportunity to develop their speaking skills in small groups and to the class.

SMSC:  The specification provides a framework and includes specific content through which we address spiritual, moral, ethical, social, legislative, economic and cultural issues.  Students are given opportunities to reflect and enhance their understanding of these areas.

SEN:  Is adapted to suit individual needs.

Stretch and challenge: Extension tasks are available across the scheme.  There is a lot of scope for free choice practicals, which allows pupils to push themselves.  Some will look to include accompaniments and high quality decorative skills in more basic tasks.

Assessment:  Pupils have a range of different assessments to include teacher feedback, self assessment and peer assessment.  Quality Marked Assessment (QMA) sheets provide detailed individual feedback to all pupils.

Homework: The tasks set are varied and include written tasks such as research, planning and evaluating.  Exam questions are another regular feature to assess understanding of the subject content and familiarise students with the format of such questions. Students can personalise some tasks to suit their strengths and interests.

 

Year 11

Overview:  This is the final year of the GCSE Food Preparation and Nutrition qualification.  It requires students to produce two Non Exam Assessment pieces that make up 50% of the final grade.  One is a Food Investigation worth 15% of the final GCSE grade and the other assesses student’s ability to plan, prepare and present 3 dishes to showcase their skill set. This makes up the final 35% of the mark. The final exam makes up the other 50%.

 

Subject content

Literacy:  Again there are a wide variety of written tasks and independent research and planning is very important.  Pupils will need to present investigation findings along with explanations and conclusions they have come to.  Research work needs to be concise and detailed and show an ability to process information to meet a specific need.

SMSC:  The specification provides a framework and includes specific content through which we address spiritual, moral, ethical, social, legislative, economic and cultural issues.  Students are given opportunities to reflect and enhance their understanding of these areas.

SEN:  Is adapted to suit individual needs.

Stretch and challenge: NEA1 is quite scientific and allows higher ability students to carry out a greater number of tasks than others. Higher order thinking skills are needed to process the findings.  NEA2 allows practical flair to shine.  Pupils have free reign to produce dishes that show higher level practical skills.

Assessment:  The NEA tasks are marked internally by the school and then the marks are submitted to the exam board.  The moderator then requests a random sample in order to verify the marks awarded.

Homework: The tasks set are varied and include written tasks such as research, planning and evaluating.  Exam questions are another regular feature to assess understanding of the subject content and familiarise students with the format of such questions. Students can personalise the exam tasks to suit their strengths and interests.

 

Career information:  Studying Food Preparation and Nutrition can lead to exciting and well paid career options. This course could lead you into roles such as a Chef, Food Product Developer, Buyer, Food Safety Inspectors, Nutritionists, Dietician, Quality Managers, Teacher, Food Scientist, Food Technologist, Food Photographer, Food Technician, Food Stylist, Home Economist, Food Critic, working in food magazines, radio and television – for more information on food careers please visit http://tastycareers.org.uk/   Don’t forget it’s an amazing life skill too!

 

Recipe Books

Year 7 Recipe Book

Year 8 Recipe Book

Year 9 Recipe Book


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